Last updated: 06 February 2017

With climate change becoming an increasing threat, society has been forced to be more creative about finding alternative ways to generate greener and eco-friendlier power.

This is the approach that Julie and Andrew Brusaw had when they first introduced roads with integrated solar panels in 2006. They claim that their technology which was accompanied by a viral Youtube video could be a game changer in the attempt to make our planet more sustainable. 

Since 2006, many solar roadway projects have been planned and implemented all over the world and have clearly gained a lot of attention. But are solar roadways really worth the hype? 

We at GreenMatch have provided you with an infographic briefly summarising the ‘hype’ and everything you need to know about: what the critics say about solar roadways, how they might change the way we generate energy and an overview of the different SR projects around the world.

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<div style="clear:both"><a href="http:&#47;&#47;www.greenmatch.co.uk/blog/2017/02/solar-roadways"><img src="http:&#47;&#47;www.greenmatch.co.uk/media/1822249/are_solar_roadways_worth_the_hype.png?width=100%" width="100%" title="Solar Roadways" alt="Solar Roadways" border="0" /></a></div>

 All in all, solar roadways are solar powered smart roads covered with tempered glass. According to Julie and Andrew, these roads can not only collect solar energy but also come with additional features. They have LED lights installed that can warn drivers about potential hazards and serve as road signs. Furthermore, solar roadways have heating elements that can melt snow and ice in colder regions. 

However, even though solar roadways have gained a lot of praise for their many benefits, many still have their doubts. So, in order to turn these critics into advocates, the material solar roadways are made out of has to run through more tests and they have to be installed where they are able to generate enough solar power to pay for themselves in the long run.